Marxist world (by Robin Varghese) 14 June 2018 Robin Varghese argues in this essay that the Marxist theory, despite its obvious shortcomings, managed to predict with astonishing precision the essential problems of contemporary capitalism: inequality rising despite of growing efficiency and stagnant or falling living standards of the absolute majority due to the “race to the bottom” in terms of...

Greece exits its bail-out programme, but its marathon has further to go 2 August 2018 The Economist discusses the current state of Greek economy which has recently been emboldened by two years of GDP growth and the official termination of the third, last round of the IMF bailout pending this August. However, long-term structural problems- low productivity, weak economic dynamic, not particularly...

A safari for Wagner (by Andrey Kamakin) 13 July 2018 This piece, first published in June 2018, has been republished following the tragic death of   three Russian journalists of the highest caliber in Central African Republic. The author discusses the role of so-called “Wagner”, a private military unit now ubiquitously claimed to be on the forefront of Russian geopolitical affairs but...

Uncertain territory. The strange life and curious sustainability of de facto states (by Thomas de Waal) 26 April 2018 In his new essay, Thomas de Waal raises a challenging question about the unexpected persistence of unrecognized post-Soviet states, as well as Northern Cyprus, which managed to establish regular civil life despite being more or less de-jure cut off from the world. He mentions that none of...

Macron Has Changed France’s Political DNA (by James Traub) 5 June 2018 James Traub, contemplating about the major outcomes of the first year of Emmanuel Macron’s presidency in France, claims that he has managed to bring a substantially new approach to the country’ politics. Being rightly seen as technocratic and a supporter of top-down governance, Macron, in order to overcome the...

A coin for the U.S.-North Korea summit. May, 2018. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)    South-East Asia: lots of elections, not so much democracy 26 May 2018 The Economist piece emphasizes the lack of democracy in South-East Asia and states while only one state can be categorized as wholly free (East Timor), remaining countries are either partly free or not free at all. The author also states that this...

Japan, China and South Korea get together 10 May 2018 This piece analyzes Mr. Abe’s invitation sent to the Chinese prime minister and the South Korean president, to come to Tokyo, and relates this step to Donald Trump’s recent steps towards North Korea. Furthermore, it states that the main push for this action had to do uncertainty over American role in the Pacific, as well as a possible trade...

  Iran among the ruins (by Vali Nasr) 13 February 2018 Vali Nasr provides a comprehensive analysis of the evolving role of Iran in the Middle East, arguing that demonizing Tehran and re-introducing sanctions against it is a bad policy for the U.S. He shows that the increasing Iranian influence in a range of countries- war-torn Syria, Iraq, Qatar- is due to a large extent to America’s own policy...

Globalization is not in retreat (by Susan Lund, Laura Tyson) 16 April 2018 In this extensive essay, Susan Lund and Laura Tyson try to refute the now-popular thesis that the age of globalization is over, and instead suggest it has taken a new form, strikingly different from the “classic” one. Among the major features characterizing it, the authors emphasize the shift of trade growth from the...

    Why China will win the trade war (by Philippe Legrain) 13 April 2018 Although Donald Trump has a strong faith that the U.S. would win the trade war with China, this Foreign Policy piece argues that China is much stronger politically and economically. If we take into account the trade war, the authors highlight that the both parties will lose, however, they will do their best to get less...

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