Macron Has Changed France’s Political DNA (by James Traub) 5 June 2018 James Traub, contemplating about the major outcomes of the first year of Emmanuel Macron’s presidency in France, claims that he has managed to bring a substantially new approach to the country’ politics. Being rightly seen as technocratic and a supporter of top-down governance, Macron, in order to overcome the...

After the decade-long dispute over the toponym Macedonia, the prime ministers of Greece and Macedonia have finally reached an official agreement. The settlement that has offered a new name, Republic of North Macedonia, was simultaneously hailed as “historic” and criticized. Kristjan Fidanovski, political science graduate and editor-in-chief of The Vostokian, will share his opinion on the recent...

The plan for a UN peacekeeping mission in the Donbas and stakes of the Russian-Ukrainian conflict Whatever its eventual outcomes, the 2018-2019 electoral seasons in Russia and Ukraine are and will be changing Eastern Europe’s political landscape. The Russian presidential elections of March this year and their current and future reverberations in Moscow’s power corridors as well as the...

On May 21, 2018, the U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the 12 demands towards Iran for starting negotiations on a new deal. However, President Trump’s diplomacy has demonstrated that his tactics lies in putting up excessive demands from the very beginning and further negotiations on an appropriate deal. In these frames, it would be interesting to look at Pompeo’s demands...

Japan, China and South Korea get together 10 May 2018 This piece analyzes Mr. Abe’s invitation sent to the Chinese prime minister and the South Korean president, to come to Tokyo, and relates this step to Donald Trump’s recent steps towards North Korea. Furthermore, it states that the main push for this action had to do uncertainty over American role in the Pacific, as well as a possible trade...

The Topchubashov Center has interviewed Rovshan Ibrahimov, Associated Professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies on the reasons and consequences of the stunning events that unfold on the divided Korean peninsula. Interviewer: Murad Muradov   Muradov: You have been living in South Korea for quite a longtime. Has there been a wide social consensus on the need to build peace with the unruly...

The revolutionary events in Armenia are approaching their logical end, and unless something totally unexpected happens in the upcoming couple of days, the protest leader Nikol Pashinyan should be elected as the country’s new Prime Minister, de-facto head of state. Unfolding in such an expected and quickly manner, this process was bound to confuse many observers and analysts alike and give way to a...

NATO`s campaign of Kosovo in 1999 was not simply a military operation of several countries against another one; in fact, as some scholars argue, it became a turning point for world order and brought about new challenges for political science.  NATO jets against Yugoslavia “represented nothing less than the beginning of the end of the Westphalian world order.” (Nichols, 2008) Set up in...

Globalization is not in retreat (by Susan Lund, Laura Tyson) 16 April 2018 In this extensive essay, Susan Lund and Laura Tyson try to refute the now-popular thesis that the age of globalization is over, and instead suggest it has taken a new form, strikingly different from the “classic” one. Among the major features characterizing it, the authors emphasize the shift of trade growth from the...

    Why China will win the trade war (by Philippe Legrain) 13 April 2018 Although Donald Trump has a strong faith that the U.S. would win the trade war with China, this Foreign Policy piece argues that China is much stronger politically and economically. If we take into account the trade war, the authors highlight that the both parties will lose, however, they will do their best to get less...

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