The University of Tartu (Estonia) announces a call for applications for doctoral candidates and PhD-holding academics in the Social Sciences for a five-month fellowship at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies, supported by the Eurasia Programme of the Open Society Foundations. The call is addressed to citizens of Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan,...

Launched in 2013, the Antall József Summer School is a twelve-day programme focusing on one of the most important regional partnerships of Europe, the Visegrad Cooperation. Through traditional and more interactive forms of education, including lectures, workshops, debates, roundtable discussions, and short trainings, the event series, organised annually, provides a profound analysis of the Visegrad...

In an auction in Alkmaar, a city in the Northern Netherlands, an aggregate of 90,000‎ guilders (ƒ‎‎) was generated from sales of tulips and other exotic flowers. A tulip sample named Viceroy was sold for ƒ4,203 while another tulip, Admirael van Enchuysen, was offered ƒ5,200.  To put into context, during much of the 17th century, an average outdoor laborer earned about...

The rivalry between two continental powers, France and Germany, defined to a great extent the streamline of the European history since the second half of the 19th century until 1945. These countries have been considered as classical examples of nation-states, where this concept found its full realization. Even now they represent two pillars of the European Union, pushing its development in quite Hegelian...

Cultural Landscapes in Central and Eastern Europe after World War II and the Collapse of Communism Wrocław, Poland, 19-21 September 2018 The end of World War II saw large parts of Central European countries in ruin. The borders were changed after the Potsdam conference, leading to mass deportations and resettlement of millions of people. Vast areas of multi-ethnic borderlands that had been typical of the...

The 19th-century British colonization of India is often regarded as a milestone in Indian culture. The Colonists are frequently credited by modern day historians for establishing relative peace, constructing critical infrastructure, leading industrialization, banning obsolete practices such as sati1 and child marriage, and spreading Western ideas. From this standpoint, past British imperialism can be...

Second World War Research Group Annual Conference, 14-15 June 2018 Strand Campus, King’s College, London Keynotes: Professor Nicholas Stargardt (University of Oxford) and Dr Daniel Todman (Queen Mary University of London)   For the major Allied powers, the Second World War has long been seen as a ‘good’ war. This has led to a mythologised version of the conflict developing in the...

School of Advanced Study, Senate House London 21-22 June 2018 The Global Decolonization Workshop (GDW) is a new collaboration between the School of Advanced Study (University of London) and New York University.  It seeks to forge a global forum for knowledge exchange in the interdisciplinary field of decolonization studies.  This series was launched at the University of London in Paris (ULIP) in...

A hundred years after the October Revolution, new revolutionary waves with certain regularity cover both countries and even entire regions of the world.   From "velvet revolution" to "color revolution" This circumstance gives reason to think about the nature of such a change of power, which sometimes leads to completely different results. Shortly before the collapse of the USSR and immediately after...

As within the few years after the World War II the USSR firmly established its hegemony over the newly socialist states of Central and Eastern Europe, the processes going on in Moscow necessarily echoed in all of them. Thus, when the new party elite headed by Nikita Khrushchev initiated a reversal of most of specifically Stalinist policies, Warsaw and Budapest, Sofia and Prague were supposed to proceed in...

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